Online-Fachtagung „Kartoffel, Kürbis, Vaterland – Landwirtschaft aus rechter Hand“, 22. & 23. März 2021

flumen als Mitveranstalterin lädt alle Interessierten herzlich ein:

Fachtagung „Kartoffel, Kürbis, Vaterland – Landwirtschaft aus rechter Hand“ – eine digitale Fachtagung zu rechten Vereinnahmungsversuchen im Ökolandbau

Wann? 22. und 23. März 2021

Die Veranstaltung richtet sich vor allem an Menschen aus der landwirtschaftlichen und gärtnerischen Praxis sowie aus Beratungs-, Netzwerk- und Verbandsarbeit. Die Teilnahme an der Fachtagung ist kostenfrei.Gerne können Sie diesen Termin über Ihre Verteiler und an Interessierte weiterleiten. Den Flyer mit vielen weiteren Informationen und die Möglichkeit zur Anmeldung finden Sie HIER

Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Die AG Rechte-Tendenzen des Netzwerkes Solidarische Landwirtschaft
E-Mail für Rückfragen: gegen-rechts@solidarische-landwirtschaft.org

Hintergrund:

„Nicht erst im Kontext des gesellschaftlichen Rechtsrucks
ist in den vergangenen Jahren deutlich geworden,
dass Akteur*innen mit antidemokratischer und
rechtsradikaler Gesinnung im Ökolandbau mitmischen.
Menschen, die sich Gruppierungen wie z.B. den
völkischen Siedlern, der AfD oder der rechtsoffenen
Anastasia-Bewegung zugehörig fühlen, ziehen aufs
Land und verbreiten dort unter dem Deckmantel der
romantischen Idylle ländlichen Lebens ihre menschenverachtende
Ideologie. Doch wie erkennen wir, ob auf
einem Hof menschenfeindliche Gesinnung Normalität ist?

Und wenn wir es erkennen, welche Handlungsstrategien
gibt es? Auf dieser Fachtagung werden
in Impulsvorträgen und vertiefenden Workshops
aktuelle rechte Strömungen auf dem Land im Kontext
der ökologischen Landwirtschaft thematisiert.
Es werden Handlungs- und Organisationsmöglichkeiten
diskutiert, um gemeinsam rassistischer und
menschenfeindlicher Gesinnung entgegenzuwirken
und Alternativen hervorzubringen.“ (Veranstaltungs-Flyer)

Matthias Schmelzer nimmt am 03.02.2021 am Workshop „The Ecology of Economic Thought“ teil (Weatherhead Center/Harvard University)

Dort präsentiert er seinen Aufsatz „The Critique of Growth in Historical Context“. Der Workshop findet von 9:30 bis 10:30 Uhr online statt. Anmeldung unter https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_QQRtKHx2SFaYIU-0ovMGJw

Programm:

‘The Limits to Certainty and the Metaphysics of Infinitude’ Nandita Badami (UC Irvine)
Discussants: Venus Bivar (York) and Kristoffer Ekberg (Chalmers)

‘Writing the History of Ecological Economic Thought’ Antoine Missemer (CIRED Paris) and Marco Paulo Vianna Franco (KLI)
Discussants: Julia Nordblad (Uppsala) and Matthias Schmelzer (Jena)

‘Critiques of Growth in Historical Context’ Matthias Schmelzer (Jena)
Discussants: Roman Gilmintinov (Duke) and Glenda Sluga (EUI)


„The Ecology of Economic Thought“ ist eine fünfteilige online-Seminarreihe des Canada Program am Weatherhead Center der Harvard University. Mehr unter https://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/canada_program/Ecology.

Neuer Artikel von Dennis Eversberg: From democracy at others’ expense to externalization at democracy’s expense: Property-based personhood and citizenship struggles in organized and flexible capitalism

Eversberg, Dennis (2021): From democracy at others’ expense to externalization at democracy’s expense: Property-based personhood and citizenship struggles in organized and flexible capitalism. In: Anthropological Theory. Special Issue: Democracy in Liberal Post-Growth Societies. doi:10.1177/1463499620977995

Abstract: This contribution investigates the anthropological foundations of European democracies’ continuous entanglement with economic and military expansionism and a hierarchical separation between public and private spheres, both of which have enabled the appropriation of nature and others’ labour as property on which citizens’ abstract personhood could be founded. Drawing on an argument made by David Graeber, it is suggested that modern European history can be interpreted as a process of the ‘generalization of avoidance’, in which such abstract, property-based forms of personhood, which were initially what defined the superior party in relations of hierarchy, came to be a model for the figures of market participant and citizen within the spheres of formal equal exchange of economy and politics. From this perspective, and building on an account of different stages of capitalist history as ‘subjectivation regimes’, the article then analyses the transition from the ‘exclusive democracy’ of post-war organized capitalism in Western Europe, in which citizens’ entitlement, through the collective guarantees of ‘social property’ (Castel), increasingly allowed individualized competitive practices of status attainment and gave rise to individualist movements for extended citizenship, to current-day flexible capitalism. This regime, seizing on those calls and instrumentalizing the desires for competitive status consumption, has effected a broad restructuring of the social as a unified field of competition in which new hierarchies and inequalities materialize in global chains of appropriation, causing a ‘dividual’ fragmentation of property-based personhood and generating calls for responsible citizenship as an inherent counter-movement. In conclusion, it is suggested that anthropologists have much to contribute to investigating the possibility of democratic, post-capitalist ‘anthropologies of degrowth’.

Kostenfrei zugänglich https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1463499620977995

Neuer Artikel von Lilian Pungas: „Caring dachas – Food self-provisioning in Eastern Europe through the lens of care“

Lilian Pungas (2021): „Caring dachas – Food self-provisioning in Eastern Europe through the lens of care“, in: Nelson, A., Edwards, F. (Hg.): Food for Degrowth. Perspectives and Practices. Routledge, London & New York, 59-74.

Abstract zum Artikel: The notions of care and stewardship are at the root of all practices concerning food production – from ploughing the soil and sowing, to harvesting, cooking, preserving and composting. Yet, in contrast to cooking, cultivating land is often not perceived as ‘classical’ care work. Instead, care is mostly framed as an interhuman activity concerned with human sustenance and reproduction and therefore, associated mostly with household work, raising children and taking care of the elderly (Waerness 1984; Jochimsen 2003). Given that care remains a rather marginalised category, my goal in this chapter is to reinforce and enrich the discourse on care in degrowth scholarship by demonstrating how food self-provisioning (FSP) in both urban and periurban areas is grounded in ideas of care and stewardship, not only as an interhuman act, but also in connection to the soil and surrounding environment. In this sense, caring means ‘reaching out to something other than the self’ (Tronto 1993, 102) implying a deep empathy with other (living) beings, as well as being followed by some form of action.

Drawing on four of Tronto’s (1993) expressions of care, I demonstrate that, despite seeming ‘irrational’ in economic terms, FSP is essentially a very rational act of care based on a deep understanding of interdependence and mutual vulnerability between humans and nonhuman nature (Gottschlich 2012). Care manifests as reciprocal ‘caring about’, ‘care-giving’ and ‘care-receiving’ with the surrounding environment, the gardener’s community and oneself. In this case study, I explore how notions of care are expressed in FSP, and how they can all be recognised as predominant intrinsic motives behind this practice. In contrast, I display how promises and narratives of industrial agriculture fall into Tronto’s fourth category (‘taking care of’) as rather ‘masculine’, ‘public’ and ‘loud’ manifestations of care. Tronto’s (2013) subsequent, fth, dimension of care (‘caring with’) constitutes a less hierarchical relationship as well as a complex interdependence between both counterparts (care-giver and care-receiver) so might provide an additional (potentially more appropriate) framework for analysing care in FSP practice. However, in this chapter the focus lies on the other four dimensions of care for the sake of nuanced analysis of specic aspects and motives of care practice with regard to FSP. 

Der Artikel ist erschienen im Sammelband Nelson, A., Edwards, F. (Hg.), 2021. Food for Degrowth. Perspectives and Practices. Routledge, London & New York.

This collection breaks new ground by investigating applications of degrowth in a range of geographic, practical and theoretical contexts along the food chain. Degrowth challenges growth and advocates for everyday practices that limit socio-metabolic energy and material flows within planetary constraints. As such, the editors intend to map possibilities for food for degrowth to become established as a field of study.

International contributors offer a range of examples and possibilities to develop more sustainable, localised, resilient and healthy food systems using degrowth principles of sufficiency, frugal abundance, security, autonomy and conviviality. Chapters are clustered in parts that critically examine food for degrowth in spheres of the household, collectives, networks, and narratives of broader activism and discourses. Themes include broadening and deepening concepts of care in food provisioning and social contexts; critically applying appropriate technologies; appreciating and integrating indigenous perspectives; challenging notions of ‚waste‘, ‚circular economies‘ and commodification; and addressing the ever-present impacts of market logic framed by growth.

This book will be of greatest interest to students and scholars of critical food studies, sustainability studies, urban political ecology, geography, environmental studies such as environmental sociology, anthropology, ethnography, ecological economics and urban design and planning.

https://www.routledge.com/Food-for-Degrowth-Perspectives-and-Practices/Nelson-Edwards/p/book/9780367436469